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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 169 (some duplicates have been removed)
. one of my clarion -- four years ago i talked at clarion which is a wonderful science-fiction five week-long six weeklong boot camp and teachers come in and go a week and i did week 4 which i was told was when everybody cries and others break down. they did not have nervous breakdowns which was great. at one point, one of my guys -- can you tell whether your letters going to make it? and i said no. and some of us are brilliant and some of us -- how do you tell? no. ones who are going to make are the ones who write and write and write. some of the ones who are brilliant may have written brilliant stories and never write again. but the ones who get in and they write every day and finish their stories and then write the next one they will make it. i saw him four months ago in arlington as he was nominated for a nebula award and he said you know, it works. he didn't get the award but still very proud of him. my wife and i loved the audio versions and never worked. you are such a terrific voice actor. did you have those voices in mind as you were writing the book? i suppose i did but also ha
are joined from the weather team with more on the science of all this. what is causing a storm of this magnitude? >> ape ve very rare case that t hurricane made landfall in new jersey. it is hurricane season so we do see a lot of storms this time of the year. usually we do not have a high-pressure system over the atlantic, called the blocking anti-cyclone, pretty self-explanatory from that name. but, you said this high-pressure system acts like a block. it is locked out of this system to move into the northeasterly path which usually -- the storms take place, take paths in that direction. but due to this high pressure sitting over here, for a while, it is very strong. cushions it, toward the eastern seaboards, of the united states. and this time -- it did make a landfall in the eastern coast. hence, the biggest storm in generations. now it has the become a remnant of low-pressure systems, so, it is much weaker than, than it was when it hit a landfall. though the tropical moisture brings all the humidity and turns and makes a lot of downpour as cross ts across the. you can see t
often our conversations about these issues are exclusively engineering and physical science kinds of questions. those matter, no doubt. they're fundamental, but there's a social dimension to this as well, which neighborhoods are affected, which individual people are affected, and it's predictable. >> fascinating, zone "a" ev evacua evacuated, low-lying residents there were twice as likely to be residents of. >>> i want to bring in ed markey, co-sponsor of the only climate bill to ever pass the chamber of congress. congressman, what is your reaction to the stunning absence of this issue that you worked so hard on and labored over and ground out a large bill with tons of technical details to carve votes on and it's now disappeared from the political conversation? >> well, i think that -- i think that mother nature decided that she was going to inject it into this election. if it wasn't going to be raised in any of the debates, then she was going to find a way of having this be discussed. and so this election for next tuesday is now framed. it's mother nature versus the unrestrained
things, like what the market is doing and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. woman: what do you mean, homeowners insurance doesn't cover floods? [ heart rate increases ] man: a few inches of water caused all this? [ heart rate increases ] woman #2: but i don't even live near the water. what you don't know about flood insurance may shock you -- including the fact that a preferred risk policy starts as low as $129 a year. for an agent, call the number that appears on your screen. ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] some day, your life will flash before your eyes. ♪ make it worth watching. ♪ the new 2013 lexus ls. an entirely new pursuit. >>> hello, everybody. i'm melisilissa rehberger. wall street will be back in business tomorrow. they will reopen wednesday after hurricane sandy shut down trading for two days. the organizers of the new york city marathon say they are going ahead with sunday's race despite the damage caused by sandy. meanwhile, ubs announced it will cut up to 10,000 jobs by 2015. they say they're tryin
that this is all bogus science? who -- are they phonies? are they quacks? >> there are different motivations. some people don't want to hear about global warming because it's bad news and there's enough bad news in the world and everybody has plenty to worry about anyway. some people don't want to hear about it because it gets in the way of their economic interests, those would be the fossil fuel companies, for instance. and some people are just generally skeptical and don't like experts, and, frankly, i don't like experts all the time myself either. but these are the facts. every academy of science of every major country in the world has said this is happening. it's happening now. it's only going to get worse until we start taking actions to stem the emissions that are causing the problem. but in the meantime, this stuff is going to be happening even if we get emissions under control for some time, for decades, so we have to learn how to adapt better, how to prepare for such a potential disaster, how to mitigate their damages. >> we don't have any high ground to go to in this where we have 6 bill
tonight 10:00 p.m. eastern. but first more "viewpoint" coming right up. politics. >>science and republicans do not mix. >>now it's your turn at the only online forum with a direct line to eliot spitzer. >>join the debate now. >> eliot: we've heard all the promises excuse, smart lines and grotesque misrepresentations. now it's time to choose. the choice is easy. on one hand you have the leader who saved us from sure fiscal di it waster, watched over a recuperating economy preserved our national security and guided our nation's international relations in rough waters insured landmark universal access to healthcare and pushed historic social policy with respect to immigration and civil rights. his challenger is supply-side reagan omics disciple who says he is fit to lead. he says he has a plan but when asked over and over for specifics can't produce. the arithmetic doesn't work. he's a governor who shares the social views he embraced to get to the primaries. he became a meyer pawn of the radical republican party, not a leader of it. on issue after issue the choice couldn't be m
. susan mchale, director of the social science research institute and one of the corps organizers of the network is here with us today. can you please stand and be recognized? thank you. [applause] >> we also made a pledge to educate our university community about ethics. it is one thing to know the rules, regulations and policies. it is another thing to create a culture where every employee wants to do the right thing the first time everytime. through training and awareness building efforts, we are trying to help people understand the how, when, where and why of reporting. i assure you can state takes this commitment very seriously. that is not a glib promised. to prove it we have stepped up our efforts and compliance. like most universities and state has dozens of compliance professionals. they are responsible for insuring research funds are appropriately used. they monitor our ncaa compliance, financial reporting, conformity to federal laws covering privacy rights and crime reporting and administer many more regulations related to the health, welfare and safety of those on camp
other. >> well, if you look at the university level, the u.s. is still the predominant science and engineering engineer in the world. if you were quantitatively come look at all kinds of dissonance on the numbers because a very large engineering graduation rate in some curlers countries, particularly china. but there's a lot of dispute about what the numbers actually mean. in terms of quality, science and engineering in the u.s. and university level are so predominant in the world, though other countries are catching up as others have said because the u.s. was the only man left standing are the only person left standing at the end of world war ii and has a free field for two or three decades. as far as k-12 is concerned, things are quite different. do you have huge disparity in quality, even with a few 50 miles or so, i think we were sitting today you can probably find outstanding quality, science and math education, k-12 and terrible quality. and that's a microcosm of the u.s. as a whole, which has huge inequalities in k-12 education system. so its average performance on all t
and i'm editor of real clear science.com. my background is microbiology. a friend of mine who became an ob gene why and set i look like a geek in that picture. that is my working in an anaerobic chamber. we grew all sorts of extremely slowly bacteria in that thing. i went to the university of washington in 2004 and got my ph.d. in 2010. i have been in the real world for two years. my personal science philosophy is straight forward and simple. if you are not an expert in his best to accept what is considered mainstream science. science should always come before politics. that means ideology or political parties are not beyond criticism. in my view i quaker team science. i don't come 14 rap or team blew. i think we shall always try to purge anti scientific thinking even if it is from our friends or political allies. so why science left behind? why pick on the left? the media is quick to cover anti scientific belief from conservatives like global warming and evolution. plot macon's made some rather an in lightning comment about pregnancy and for days this was a front-page story about ho
could talk about what is going on -- what is the current state of science education in the united states? may be some of your view of what we could be doing better -- may be some of your view of what we could be doing better. >> the u.s. is a prominent science and engineering producer in the world. you will get all kinds of dissonance in the numbers i feel quantitatively because of their large engineering graduation rates in some very large countries come up to believe china, but there's a lot of dispute about what those numbers actually mean. in terms of quality, the science and engineering fields in the u.s. at the university level are the highest, though others are catching up, as others have said, because u.s. was the only man left standing or only person left standing at the end of world war ii, and it had the free field for two or three decades. as far as k-12 concerned, things are quite different. you have a huge disparity in the quality, even within 50 miles or so. i think of where we're sitting today. you would probably find outstanding quality, science and math education, and t
of man-made global warming is a hoax. >> the science is bad. >> unproven science. >> that has yet to be proven and i highly doubt it's going to happen any time soon. >> still a scientific theory that has not been proven. >> cenk: that's the media. that's the republicans. when you turn to the democrats i wish i had good news for you. but president obama hasn't been that much better in his results. now he was recently on mtv kind of like candy crowly, he views it as a niche-type-of-topic. >> obama: we're not moving as fast as we need to. this is an issue that further generations, mtv viewers are going to have to be dealing with, even more than the older generation. this is a critical issue. there is a huge contrast in this campaign between myself and governor romney. i'm surprised it didn't come up in one of the debates. >> cenk: here's how it could have come up, if you brought it up. did you notice, you mtv viewers i guess you care about this because you'll be around when things get really bad. although things are getting bad now. and he said he has a much different record than mit
watched for any science of depreciation following that meeting. let's have a look at the currency levels on the screen. 79.76 to 79 and the euro yen 102.94 to 99. the yen really is going to be closelywatcd. >> what's the latest on the earnings stream? >> a lot of earnings. we've been focused on export relates. july to september group net profits showed a small gain due to fixed income trading. it's going through severe cost cutting measures as well as internal management infrastructure and losses to investment banki structure. still a lot of folks on the alle details. just checking the price action today it's up 3%. markets taking it as a bit of a positive. back to you. >> thanks. people running japan's local governments may so beurning out their pockets for loose ange afterational government officials say they will postpone the payment of tax grants. the move comes as it looks increasingly unlikely to pass a bill to issue deficit covering bonds. the main opposition parties are against it. the bonds are necessary to implement the budget. government officials say they could run out of mon
has become the blue angels of science. we do lots of stunts, and we are very successful at doing those stunts and we do them at high speeds, and between this project and the project for cal train to electifiy it over the next seven years $3 billion is going to be spent regionally on transit here, and we can say thank you to the secretary of transportation and to the regional transit authorities who have create thursday opportunity for the transportation. >> >> that will create a 22nd century of transit for the tronst century of jobs so thank you to secretary lahood and thank you to the leadership for all that we have accomplished here today. [applause] >> peter rogof was dominated to serve in the federal administration by the department of transportation in 2009 by president barack obama. he has over see the disbursement throughout the country through the american reinvestment act and has done so meeting every milestone established by that act. getting money into hands of transit operators whose budgets were severely strained by the worse economic downturn since our great depre
in these terms and thought of economics as a moral science. and that you needed to ask always the question enough for what, what is money for? otherwise you are adrift. you just go on accumulating without end, without purpose. so he said enough for a good life. and he thought that technology was bringing that about. that it was actually producing such increases in weths th s ise would be able to have abundance with a fraction of the work. that people would then do. but that bit of it hasn't come about. >> why? >> i think a number of explanations. one is that our society's become much more unequal than it was when canes was writing. the other is i think he underestimated the force of insatiablity. the relative character -- >> you end up with new needs and new wants. if you have one car, you feel like maybe it will be even more fun to have three. in the book it seems to me -- correct me if i'm wrong -- briefly what you're saying is you need a good what we would consider good or upper middle-class in terms of material comforts, house, things like that. beyond that, the kind of constant accumulation
-- >> jennifer: that's the language of science right? >> it isn't really. much of science isn't like that. like anything that i just mentioned about biology economics and so on. but climate scientists are using that incorrectly. there is real systemic causation here. and systemic causation happens when certain things are present. for example you might have multiple causes. you might have a network of causes. you might have feedback groups. all of those really occur in nature. and what happens here is very clear. in hurricane sandy you have a special kind of hurricane that is normal. actually when you have global warming. it is normal because its characterization is it's huge. it has a huge amount of moisture. it has a huge amount of energy that goes into the winds. how does this happen? every climate scientist knows perfectly well that when you have global warming you get more evaporation over the oceans lots more moisture in the air. when that happens you get heat in the oceans. heat transfers in storms into wind
] [ crowd chants u.s.a. ] >> cenk: i love that reaction. hey, what about climate science? u.s.a.! u.s.a.! we're number one! ha ha, take that, climate change. luckily, not everybody's that dense. new cover of business week is it's global warming stupid. we now have the author of that article, assistant managing editor of bloomberg business week joining us now. some believe this cover story is a bit controversial. do you believe it is? >> no, obviously the cover language is meant to get people's attention but if you read the story itself, you see we're playing it right down the middle. the issue here is not to blame climate change for any one particular storm but to say that the conditions in the atmosphere have indisputably changed and as a result of those changes, all storms generally speaking are going to be prone to be more severe and more frequent and we are beginning to see in undeniable terms the price of the warming of the atmosphere, the warming of the ocean waters and the rise of the ocean waters. >> cenk: paul, here's the problem with that. you say it's undeniable, all the scientist
code word for climate science for it stop funding climate science. romney himself says there is no scientific consensus so we should support more debate and investigation within the scientific community, except no action but to make problems worse. what about democrats? they conceded there is a problem and advocate that we work toward a problem -- program to set limits with other emerging powers. but that's it. no action. in fact, obama has emphasized, we have to work hard to gain when because 100 years of energy independence by exploiting domestic or canadian resources by fracking and other elaborate technologies. it does not ask what the world would look like in 100 years. so there are differences. the differences are, basically, about how enthusiastically the lemmings' should march toward the cliff. [laughter] the second major issue, nuclear war. it is also on the front pages daily. but in a way that was seem outlandish to some independent and fervoobserver. it does seem outrageous to many around the world. the current threat, not for the first time, is in the middle
of the social science research institute and a co-organizer of the research is here today. susan, can you please stand to be recognized? thank you. [applause] we also made a pledge to educate the university community about ethics. it's one thing to know the rules, regulations, and policies; it's another thing to create a culture where every employeements to do the right thing the first time every time. through training and awareness building efforts, we're trying to help people understand the how, when, where, and why of reporting. i assure you that penn state takes this commitment very seriously. that's not a glib promise. to prove it, we stepped up efforts in compliance. like most universities, penn state has dozens of compliance professionals. they're responsible for ensuring research funds are appropriately used, they monitor the nca compliance, the financial reporting, conformity to federal laws covering privacy rights and crime reporting, and they administer regulations related to the health, welfare, and safety of those on campuses including our patients. what we've discovered, however, i
by the audience, of faculty members, and political science department, as well as the byu law school. some questions were edited for clarity. mr. hall will have the first question of the debate. for subsequent questions, we will alternates. each candidate will have a minute to as a question and both will have an additional 30 seconds for a bottle. if i determine that a follow-up question is aboard -- is appropriate, each will have a follow-up question. the first is from joseph, a student at purdum non-. -- at byu. >> what responsibilities are the state and local government and what responsibilities, if any, are the federal government? >> i served on the board of directors for sutter health care, so the largest not-for- profit health-careization in california we have known for a long time that we've had to have affordable quality health care. it is all our responsibility. under the affordable care act, we are first beginning to do what we need to do to reform health care system to make it affordable for all of us. i would like to put my children back on to health care until they're 26. i al
is sort of the science of the campaign. the obama campaign has its ground game down to precise numbers, who they have to turn out where, they're spending so much time and money figuring this out. that's science. the romney campaign is passion, energy, they're coming on, their campaign seems a little more excited. part of that's the nature of being a challenger versus an incumbent running a re-election. depending on which city you're in, boston or chicago, you come out with two different -- both make really compelling cases for themselves. the polls are tight enough that either one could be totally not spinning and believing it, but who knows? >> who knows? >> tom brokaw, just final thoughts in the final days of the campaign, how much should the events matter? then you've got the science of the campaign muddled by the storm. >> well, if nothing happens that is unexpected between now and then, the scenario is going to be does the romney wave override the obama ground game and getting out the vote? the romney people have been counting on what happened with reagan, as you know, in 1980. di
from his first daof work this last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. frotd ameritrade. >> well, today's big storm on the east coast taking some attention away from the election and it's only eight days away. and both candidates are more focused on hurricane sandy. obviously, all of us across the country are concerned about the potential impact of hurricane sandy. this is a serious and big storm. charles: and also appears to be slowing town mitt romney's momentum. the latest gallup has romney up 4 points, 50-46 down one point from the previous poll and the latest rasmussen poll has romney romney by 3. we'll get the new number from scott rasmussen shortly and the washington poll, romney with a 1 point lead for the third consecutive day and a lot of people are talking about the controversial ad featuring, actress lena dunham. >> and of anybody, we want to do it with a great guy, it should be with a guy with beautiful, who understands women. >> and andrea, what congresswoman marsha blackburn. a young actress voting for the essential october is offensive to me f
and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. which isn't rocket science. so i test... a lot. do you test with this? freestyle lite test strips? i don't see... beep! wow! that didn't take much blood. yeah, and the unique zipwik tab targets the blood and pulls it in. so easy. yep. freestyle lite needs just a third the blood of onetouch ultra. really? so testing is one less thing i have to worry about today. great. call or click today and get strips and a meter free. test easy. >>> paul ryan is running for vice president of the united states. why is the man running for president of the united states sending his running mate to places in the united states where the people who are going to decide the election cannot see him? that's ahead. zeebox is the free app that makes tv even better. if your tv were a prom queen, zeebox would be a stretch limo. with this enchanting union, comes a sunroof she can scream from... i'm goin' to prom! [ male announcer ] ...and a driver named bruce that she can re-name james... faster, james
and from here it's going to go up. the tidal predictions are to the exact science. it's almost like river forecasts. the high drolgss make them with the best knowledge they have. it's not as good as your forecast we give you days in advan advance. it's not the exact science. fluid situation with the storm and a lot of factors and so right now, we're thinking it's going to be about two to three feet higher than what we saw when it was down here on the edge splashing over. that means if i was standing right here at about 8:30 this evening, the water could potentially be somewhere between here to here with wave action over the top of that. this is a flat area in lower manhattan. not a lot of elevation change. about three blocks in inland they have the subways all sandbagged. they are expecting the worst and the possibility of all the water heading underground to the subway system. normally it's heavy rains. they do get flooded. this is saltwater. the electrical switches, all the problems they could have with that. think of the nightmare they would have trying to replace that stuff if it got
in the science. the science of climate change does not consider the sun. the sun is very potent, a very potent aspect of our climate. that is the problem. the sun travels around the black hole in the center of the galaxy and it takes millions of years. each part of this journey has a different results. host: here's more images for you from the newspapers this morning on the aftermath of this storm. here is the new york post, freight in a storm for travelers shows a picture -- franenstorm. and here is the new york post with images of a fleet of the taxicabs sittings of march and a parking lot yesterday in hoboken, new jersey. and the front page of the new trailpost, frankenstorm's of ruin and despair. any despair in queens yesterday. in sacramento, calif., on our line for democrats, go ahead. . caller: i go back to a comment made by one of the candidates. this was an regard to a woman [indiscernible] i was wondering if the same person would think it is an act of god also. thank you. host: that was wesley in sacramento. let me give the political articles before we conclude here. this is the fron
science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. >>> what i can't promise you is that the federal government will be working as closely as possible with the state and local officials and we will not quit until this is done. >> we're going to box these things up in just a minute and put them on some trucks, and then we're going to send them into i think it's new jersey is a site that we've identified that can take these goods and distribute them to people who need them. >> oh, it's hard out there for a presidential candidate who is utterly irrelevant to the massive relief effort president obama is running in the aftermath of this week's historic storm. because the desperate and shameless romney campaign believes it cannot win the election without winning ohio, team romney pushed their poor candidate out onto a stage in ohio yesterday because the storm was still in progress in some states and the death count was climbing in new york and elsewhere. traditional political decency dictated that mitt romney not be caught campaigning yesterday. and so team romney hastily rewrote a campaig
what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. [ husband ] transfer! [ male announcer ] free data transfer at home. you just deleted all the photos! you did! no you did! [ male announcer ] or free data transfer when you buy a windows 8 computer at staples. another way staples makes it easier to upgrade. when you buy a windows 8 computer at staples. this is hayden. he's five years that's elizabeth. and that's skyler... and his mom, nancy. they're just a few of the californians who took it on themselves to send you a message about what they need to restore years of cuts to their schools. prop thirty-eight. thirty-eight raises billions in new revenue - bypasses sacramento and sends every k through 12 dollar straight to our local schools... every school. for them. for all of us. vote yes on thirty-eight. >>> this year's presidential debate cycle was the first since 1988 in which candidates or moderators failed to directly address the issue of climate change. i guess they just didn't get around to it. now just days before the election, hurricane
science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. oh, hey alex. just picking up some, brochures, posters copies of my acceptance speech. great! it's always good to have a backup plan, in case i get hit by a meteor. wow, your hair looks great. didn't realize they did photoshop here. hey, good call on those mugs. can't let 'em see what you're drinking. you know, i'm glad we're both running a nice, clean race. no need to get nasty. here's your "honk if you had an affair with taylor" yard sign. looks good. [ male announcer ] fedex office. now save 50% on banners. [ male announcer ] jill and her mouth have lived a great life. but she has some dental issues she's not happy about. so i introduced jill to crest pro-health for life. selected for people over 50. pro-health for life is a toothpaste that defends against tender, inflamed gums, sensitivity and weak enamel. conditions people over 50 experience. crest pro-health for life. so jill can keep living the good life. crest. life opens up when you do. >> a fox news weather alert. i'm anna kooiman, forecasters warning of a monstrous wa
the world is, like, 80% water, right? that means the world has to be like 90% air. that's just science. think it's weird to collect air? you wouldn't think so if you saw what your lungs collect every time you breathe. people can make fun of me all they want, but i choose to see the glass half-full. of air. protect your health with life-saving air quality updates from the american lung association. get our free "state of the air" app at lung.org. >> stos that win. >> go to any hospital they need equipment and i like it and i still lo it >> adam. chevron. neal inexpensive and healthy dividend and a safe stock. >>
to cut college tuition in half for the next decade. 100,000 math and science teachers in the next 10 years. [applause] we talk about jobs, we talk about a decent job, a job you can raise a family on. own a home, not red. have a decent school to send your child to. -- own a home, not rent. have a decent school to send your child to. helps send them to college. help your parents when they get older. that is why we are creating new manufacturing jobs, ted double exports. change the tax code, of four companies that come home, not those that go abroad. -- reward companies that come home, not those that go abroad. trained to million people over the next three years at community colleges. working with businesses to make sure students can finish school and go into jobs that are now open. on energy, we will continue to cut oil imports. in half by 2020, producing more american made energy. oil, clean coal, natural gas. those will create 600,000 new jobs. wind, biofuel, solar. we are already requiring automobiles to double their mileage by 2025. that alone will save $1.70 trillion at the pump a
people so they can get decent jobs and start growing again. to invest in science and technology and research. that's a better economic plan than one more round of tax cuts spending by a 22% cut on on education, science, and technology. it is bad for youngstown state, and obama's plan is better for the future of america. obama's education plan is better for the future of america. he is committed to hiring 100,00 0 new science, technology, and math teachers. committed to cutting the rate of inflation of college costs in half and to the student loan reform program, the single most important thing nobdody knows about. this alone justifies his reelection if you believe in the future. the old student loan system worked like -- the federal government paid the banks to make loands and guaranteed 93% of the loans. the new system -- under that old system, it meant we dropeped to 16th in the world in college degrees. a perscription for disaster. almost every job is created by someone with a degree. we can't afford to be 16th in the world. so what did the president and congress do? what did
is committed to hiring 100 and thousand new science and technology teachers in our schools. committed to cutting the rate of inflation cut in half and committed to the student loan program. [applause] the old student loan system works like this. the federal government pays the bank a fee to make loans and the guaranteed 90% worth of loans. the new system works like this. under that old system, we dropped to 16 in the world with our young people with college degrees. it is a recipe for disaster. we cannot afford to be 16th in the world. what do the president and congress do? they passed laws to change the system. the government sets aside a loan reserve saying these are the ones eagle for loans. starting next year, everyone in the country gets one of these loans will have the absolute right to pay back as a low fixed percent of their income. think about this. [applause] what that means is nobody ever has to worry whether they cannot pay their loans. if he get out of college and you want to go teach in a small town in ohio or the salaries are low, you can do it anyway for a few years be
science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. >>> a tough day and the stock market wasn't even open. half the country got pounded by hurricane sandy. how about some good news. coal after getting absolutely pulverized, 74% from the peak. rb on a technical basis. my cleek at the street.com. the dow jones coal index is reversing it is actually started breaking out to the upside. ♪ hallelujah and once the markets open again he thinks we could have a serious coal rally. why are they so, confidence. take a look at the weekly chart at the u.s. coal index. it shows that investors it has pretty much defined the downtrend in the coal index. it was only in brief rallies. for months and months and mon months, that is the national park. fitzpatrick points out that the balance of aggressiveness has normalized and for the last few months it has turned sideways. security changes handed at the same general level. base building and it is awaiting a resolution. now the buyers are taking wall street coal index. it has become light. time down to the kurpt price and now we reached a point where the coo
other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> jennifer: so for several months now, christine pelosi and i have been trying to get duf sundheim to throw his support behind the president. tonight is our final penitentiary. welcome back to you both. duf are you ready to say uncle? >> you know what, i didn't find the fact that you called the fact that your father your favorite republican, but when you put christie ahead of me it hurt my feelings. >> jennifer: all right. epic fail on my part. >> here you can have the halloween candy. okay. chris christie had a beautiful moment today. not only did barack obama look very presidential but chris christie took a tentative step towards 2016. >> jennifer: yeah, let's just say that duf could have a beautiful moment right here. >> i think that was back in april 15th that you were right. >> jennifer: let me do something here, duf. vice president biden had a very interesting line about mitt romney today. take a listen in florida. >> his plans are sketchy, they are etch-a-sketchy. that's wh
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 169 (some duplicates have been removed)